Water

waters speed shutter nikimarie shooting Simon Q. Walden, FilmPhotoAcademy.com, sqw, FilmPhoto, photography

THINKING:

When shooting water you really need to consider how you want the water to be represented for the particular concept you have in mind.

You can shoot with a slow shutter speed to give flowing water streams.

You can shoot with a fast shutter to freeze the motion of the water.

You can use a polarising filter to remove glare and penetrate into the water. Alternatively, you can let the highlights show the turbulence of the water.

You can use still waters to give reflections of your subject, or moving waters to break it down.

SEEING:

This image shows NikiMarie thrusting, almost leaping out of the water like a powerful mermaid.

The flowing waters at the bottom of the picture provide a contrasting line against the start of NikiMarie's body. In turn, the torso and head's skin tones are contrasted nicely against the green leaves behind.

DOING:

I have had to climb right into the waterfall for this shot so that I can get a good low camera angle and a strong sense of the rushing water.

I am hand holding the camera about 12 inches above the water line shooting at 35mm - very wide for me, but this exaggerates the water splashes.

Shutter speed is 1/90th of a second. This is a compromise speed to ensure that NikiMarie is held sharp even while moving, but gives some movement in the water, not freezing it in place.

 
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waters speed shutter nikimarie shooting Simon Q. Walden, FilmPhotoAcademy.com, sqw, FilmPhoto, photography

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